Make Your Own Sour Dough Bread! Start With This Sour Dough Bread Starter!

Greetings my friends! It is such a blessing to have you with me today! Our world continues to get stranger by the day. It has become very evident that there may come a time in the near future when things like going to the grocery becomes nearly impossible. As the world situation has progressed, it has become increasing clear that if we are not able to provide for ourselves, we may not like what happens to us.

One of the easiest and most useful things you can do to start your self sufficiency journey is to learn to make sour dough bread starter. It takes a week to 10 days or so to get the starter to a point where you can start using it, but after that, it just continues to be useful almost indefinitely. With a productive starter, the recipes that use the starter are amazingly diverse. With a few simple pantry staples, you can provide your family with fresh baked breads and rolls of all types. I realize we don’t live by bread alone, but if you are finding it hard to purchase groceries, it will keep bellies full and energy up during hard times.

We will begin the starter process today and give you the instructions for a full week. I will be producing a video in a few weeks on the entire process from beginning to end. I will also be showng different recipes for the starter over the coming months. If nothing else, providing fresh, homemade bread will be a delight to you, your family and your friends. With the Holidays just around the corner, you can surprise your guests with a culinary delight you made yourself for all those holiday dinners and pitch ins. As we work our way through this process, you will see that if you wish to share your starter with others, there will be ample opportunities.

So, how does it work? The basic concept behind sour dough starter is that your mixture will start to attracted and feed natural yeast and good bacteria. These elements will grow as you continue to feed the mixture. When it is fully developed, it will contain enough natural yeast and bacteria to make your bread rise when you use it in a recipe. It is the good bacteria that will give your starter and your finished products that slightly sour twang you are looking for. It is a combination of the yeast and bacteria that will cause your bread to rise as both will produce carbon dioxide during the baking process increasing the height.

The most important parts are to use the same amounts of water and flour at the start and for all the feedings that follow. It is important that you use a clean jar every time you discard a portion of the starter and feed it more. The starter will produce acid as it comes along. This acid will kill off any harmful bacteria that comes along so it is unlikely that your starter will spoil. If you notice any kind of pink or orange colored growth, this indicates mold and the starter should be discarded and started again.

The water you use is vitally important. If you are on city water, the added chlorine will kill the active yeast and render your starter a dud. It is best to use bottled water in these cases or you can boil and cool the water to eliminate any chorine. OK! Let’s get started!

First, start with a clean, sterilized jar with a loose fitting lid or cheesecloth cover. NOTE: Use a jar or container that is large enough to double the beginning measure plus room for the mixture to double in size after feedings as things progress.

Day 1: Mix 1/2 cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water. Note: many people are very very fussy about this part. They insist on using a scale to measure exactly the same weight of water to the exact same weight of flour. If you don’t have this equipment, using equal measures of each has worked well for me in the past and is the method I still use. If you don’t get the results you want, you can try using the scale method. It is important to use equal measures all along the way. After you have mixed your flour and water, cover your jar loosely so that any gases that form are allowed to escape. Leave the starter in a room temperature (70 – 75 degrees) area for 24 hours.

Day 2: Add 1/2 cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water and mix thoroughly. Cover loosely and leave at room temperature for another 24 hours.

Day 3: REMOVE 1/2 of the starter. You can either use the discarded portion in another jar and continue with 2 jars, you can pass it along to a friend with instructions to keep it going or you can discard it. Add 1/2 cup of water and 1/2 cup of flour to the remaining starter and mix well. Cover loosely and leave at room temperature for another 24 hours.

Day 4 through Day 10. Repeat day 3 process each day until the starter starts to smell like yeast bread and is fermenting nicely. You can check to see if your starter is ready to use by observing it to see if it doubles in size within 2-3 hours after you feed it.

When it is ready to use, you are ready to bake! If you are not ready to bake, you can refrigerate your started until you are ready. If you want to keep it going for a long time, it is best to feed it by repeating step 3 once a month or so.

If your starter is refrigerated and you want to use it, take it out of the refrigerator 3 days before you want to bake. When the starter is at room temperature, feed it at room temperature for 2 days. It will be refreshed and ready to go on the third day.

When you have taken out whatever amount you need for your recipe, reserve 1 cup of the starter and feed it again before returning it to the refrigerator.

AS I mentioned, we will be using this started over the next few months so stay tuned! Thanks so much for being here. If this has be helpful to you or if you know someone who might find this helpful, please like, subscribe and share! I look forward to being with you again next time when we make our skin healing and itch stopping lotion! Hope to see you there!

Love,

Suzy

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